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New Leash Laws at Rosemont Parks

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New rules related to dogs at parks are being considered. The Rosemont Park Dist. board discussed its dog leash law at a meeting on Tuesday, and will consider changing its policy at a meeting in November.
The district’s current law states dogs may be brought into parks “provided they are held by suitable line, chain or strap.”
The village has a law that states a “dog at large,” or a dog out of control and not on a leash, is a finable offense at $20. Neglecting to clean up after a dog defecates is also finable at $20, according to a village ordinance.
Richard Drehobl, board president, said trustees want to compare the park’s leash law with the village’s law, and make sure they are consistent.
“We want them to fit close together because the parks and the village of Rosemont have an intergovernmental agreement that the police department will enforce the laws within the village and the parks because the park district doesn’t have a police department like some big park districts do,” Drehobl said.
Drehobl said one issue that prompted the review of the leash law is people tying their dogs to backstops at baseball fields, bleachers and other park facilities.
“We’ve had a couple complaints of people trying to walk down the sidewalks, and the dog’s lunging at them or jumping, and we don’t want to have any problems,” Drehobl said. “We want to correct the problem before we have one.”
Drehobl said any recommendation for changing the leash law would be reviewed by the village’s attorney next month.
“We don’t want to have somebody get bit by a dog, and we’re concerned about that,” Drehobl said.
Drehobl said the park district would work with the public safety department to communicate any changes in the law to residents, and initially issue warnings instead of citations.
“We don’t want to make it rough on anybody,” Drehobl said. “There haven’t been any incidents, but we just want to make sure that everybody is safe.”
Another aspect of the rules the board will consider, Drehobl said, is whether or not to make a law regarding cleaning up after dogs.
“It’s terrible – all over the sidewalks – they don’t pick it up,” Drehobl said.
 

 
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